Is LSD dangerous? Why, of course it is. But to the brain less dangerous than a brownie.

An interview with Sage Mar-tin-us Ben-ders

Is it dangerous? What a crazy question. Of course it is dangerous. Everything in nature is dangerous. You stick your head out of a hole and it gets bitten off by another animal. There is no such thing as a safe nature. It’s a jungle out there. Nevertheless, there are some comments to be made about the dangers of LSD.

What are they?

First of all, the sixties were a continuation of the fifties, and in both decades the western market was flooded with the speed that was left over from the Second World War. Many people do not know this, but the reason why the Germans were able to conquer Europe so fast was because of their chemical concerns that supplied all the soldiers with endless amounts of speed. That made them powerful and cruel. The same crap was dumped on the ‘alternative market’ and almost all those hippies were on speed. And under those conditions they used LSD – with a very strong pull towards paranoia and darkness, that is. Only the problems were not attributed to the speed but to the LSD. Same story with marijuana. Everything mixed up, big mess, LSD easy scapegoat.

But people went crazy as soon as they took the LSD, right?

I would rather say the opposite: only under LSD did they see how insane their reality was, and that aroused so much fear that they quickly managed to find the arms of the Good Shepherds again, who were busy setting up a huge industry in which an incredible number of people could get a bullshit job based on the paradigm that ‘the brain is sick’. I can just picture them, those young hippies, tight-lipped and paranoid on speed, sitting in the office of a psychiatrist who 10 years ago was still picking at people with a knife in their foreheads to ‘help’ them. They got a Nobel Prize for it from our friends in “Science”. Really, check it out. Inventor of the lobotomy knife, the Nobel Prize.

Not crazy according to you, but what did they experience?

The normal/mad dichotomy is the most parasitic approach you can put on reality. In reality there is only experience, nothing is normal or crazy. People who take LSD or other mushrooms don’t ‘hallucinate’ at all but start to get to know their senses as they were meant to be, not curtailed to 5% of their capacity, not living in a summary of the brain but actually starting to perceive the real reality.

This idea is diametrically opposed to that of classical psychiatry.

Perhaps, it depends a bit on what you call ‘classical psychiatry’. In the past, the same chemical corporations that helped the Germans get their hands on speed in WW2 and then the hippies through this “new industry” have been able to “help” the world with a whole range of addictions. Speed this time in the form of Aderall given to children to destroy their brains and their DNA. If you consider that a form of science, you are probably also a fan of Mengele. If you don’t think that’s science at all, welcome to the real world.

But I come back to the original question: is LSD dangerous or not?

Yes, nature is dangerous. It’s watching your back. And it is studying and applying the instructions carefully. One of the rules with LSD is that you must have a tripsitter. That is no joke.

Look at what happened to Nick Cave’s son. I think he was only 15, and during a trip on LSD he jumped off a cliff at the coast of southern England. No tripsitter, but he did have a friend who was also tripping. Compare it to walking down a dangerous path on two bottles of vodka. You wouldn’t do that either. But somehow people don’t take LSD seriously as intoxication and it certainly is.

Friends of mine have experienced first-hand how dangerous LSD can be. They live in a rocky area in southern Europe by the Mediterranean Sea. They had befriended a local girl who had never tripped before and the four of them had gone into the rocky mountain forests on a tab. Suddenly the girl took off all her clothes and ran naked into the forest. A few hundred metres further she jumped naked off a rock and broke her neck. My friend, tripping on LSD himself, had to hold her with a broken neck and all, waiting for the ambulance, and she died in his arms. A nightmare! He said to me, when I remarked that there should have been a tripsitter, that he probably could not have stopped her either. But that is not true in my opinion, a good attentive tripsitter would have done just that.

Why does such a person do such a thing?

LSD is a drug that gives a strong push to what tolltecs call the gathering point. For example, as a tripsitter I have taken people into the woods who suddenly no longer knew how they had got there. They were totally lost. And if you do not have a tripsitter with you to tell you how it happened, you quickly start to panic.

Besides that you have the problem that untrained people see everything they hear as their own thoughts. As a seer, however, you see that substances like LSD can open you up to entities from other worlds. If you are well trained in resisting voices, you already have a great advantage – if you lack such training, LSD is probably not a good idea at all.

So you advise against LSD for certain people?

Sure. Especially if they are also planning to mix drugs. LSD is no joke. I also think it is best to use LSD as an early teenager. It makes you experience again what school has destroyed in you. Something you already lost during your first, second year of life and later on completely.

And why should you have to get to know that again?

You don’t have to do anything by me. But there is a kind of clarity in this drug that you can also hear, for example, in the songs of Leonard Cohen, a major user of LSD. Leonard, like most hippies, unfortunately also had a speed addiction, which gave his music its dark side, but the all-pervading clarity that you hear in his songs, that’s the spirit of LSD. You don’t have to cover it up with speed or cannabis. And it’s a very different kind of clarity than the machine mind knows. If you want to get to know it, be respectful, careful, follow the instructions, and above all: don’t think there is anything that can replace training. It’s true in this area too: it’s 95% discipline. And when you advance, that becomes 99%. And advance more, 99.99%.
Welcome to the real world.

Mountains, giants and mushrooms – in this fairytale-like collection, magic whirls and swirls, yet another reality breaks through as well – the whole world turned into The Shining, and the pilgrimage to Szymborska’s grave, a simple stone in Krakow, fails at the last minute; a journey without check marks across sixteen national borders to his daughter, however, succeeds. In its combination of fairy-tale nature, historical background and eerily topical reality, this collection of poems is Benders’ best since he lost count.

 

You have no time to read this, but that is because you are no longer human. If something of the original person were still alive in you, the old mycelia of childhood, then you would learn a lot from this book, indeed, with its magical knowledge, it might become your most useful possession. A book about the human imagination, and how it managed to get into the iron grip of trans-dimensional cockroaches. Furthermore, there are also magical tips to substantially improve your life and your time acceleration, and M.H.H. Benders also makes light-hearted mincemeat of the entire Dutch literature, what more could you want!

If you don’t want to crawl around mars like a cyber insect under a scrubbed boot – which is on the agenda – then you’d do well to read this book.

The first collected work of Martinus Hendrikus Hogervorst-Benders comprises no fewer than 712 pages and weighs in at least 1.4 kilos in thin print. It is the most ambitious collection written in the last thirty years, and certainly one of the highlights of Dutch literature as a whole, in line with Snoek and van de Woestijne. Anyone with a heart for literature and who wants to read an ambitious book brimming with cast-iron poems instead of yet another typical Dutch-language ‘masterpiece’ will be delighted with the purchase of this brick.

The Microdose Bible is the worlds most comprehensive and complete oversight of mind altering substances, teacher plants and mushrooms. Dutch mycologist and philosopher M.H.H.Benders takes you on a magical journey full of wonder about what teachers nature has to offer. Includes the Psychosupersum, a guide that describes all known mental disorders and offers wisdom for their treatment. 

This book will be published end of 2022.